Tag Archives: “Septuagint Research” Summaries

A Reflection

I have found an encouraging thread throughout the tapestry of this book.  Interest in Septuagint scholarship is on the rise.  If you go into Southeastern’s library, you might find half a book shelf to a full book shelf worth of … Continue reading

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“Idol Worship in Bel and the Dragon and Other Jewish Liturature from the Second Temple Period”

For those unfamiliar with the “Apocrypha,” the title Bel and the Dragon may sound like a child’s story.  Whatever you may think of the story, it is simply an addition to the book of Daniel and it has the topic … Continue reading

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“Messianism in the Septuagint”

It has been a while since I have provided you with some of my gleanings within the realm of LXX studies.  This is due in part because I took a break from posting about my reading and it is also … Continue reading

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“Interlinearity in 2 Esdras: A Test Case”

I have two important words for you today: isomorphism and anacoluthon. Isomorphism “equal/same form,” as it applies to our subject of interest (you’re right, my subject of interest), is the method of translation that seeks to render form for form. … Continue reading

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“Reconstructing the OG of Joshua”

Now, which of you took a look at the title of this post and said, “that sounds like a revetting topic of study?”  Me neither.  The first half of the article was excruciatingly boring and difficult to follow.  Granted, this could have been … Continue reading

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“The Hermeneutics of Translation in the Septuagint of Genesis”

Robert J. V. Hiebert, one of the translators of the book of Genesis in NETS, walks his reader through his translation decisions in Genesis 17.  As I have previously mentioned, the NETS adopts an “upstream” method of interpretation.  Hiebert concedes … Continue reading

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“Contemporary Translations of the Septuagint: Problems and Perspectives”

Wolfgang Kraus has provided his reader with a brief guide through the available translations of the Septuagint.  He focuses on their guiding methodologies which lead to certain strengths and weakness. At the outset we encounter the tension between a translation … Continue reading

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